December132013
sagansense:

“I believe the simplest explanation is, there is no God. No one created the universe and no one directs our fate. This leads me to a profound realization that there probably is no heaven and no afterlife either. We have this one life to appreciate the grand design of the universe and for that, I am extremely grateful.” - Stephen Hawking

sagansense:

“I believe the simplest explanation is, there is no God. No one created the universe and no one directs our fate. This leads me to a profound realization that there probably is no heaven and no afterlife either. We have this one life to appreciate the grand design of the universe and for that, I am extremely grateful.”
- Stephen Hawking

(Source: thedragoninmygarage)

December122013
Are you ready for the finale?! 
Geminid Meteor Shower is on the way this weekends. Fireballs are starting to show every night! Look for meteors starting 10:00 pm local time. 
Photo Credit: Henri Luoma

Are you ready for the finale?! 

Geminid Meteor Shower is on the way this weekends. Fireballs are starting to show every night! Look for meteors starting 10:00 pm local time. 

Photo Credit: Henri Luoma

November72013
sagansense:


In the past few decades, new instruments that capture and display galactic images with unprecedented detail, combined with new modeling approaches, have made it possible to see and understand the Milky Way Galaxy as never before. Take a long look at our galactic home in the new Space Show Dark Universe.
A time-lapse of type 1a supernovae in the Milky Way galaxy

via amnhnyc

sagansense:

In the past few decades, new instruments that capture and display galactic images with unprecedented detail, combined with new modeling approaches, have made it possible to see and understand the Milky Way Galaxy as never before. Take a long look at our galactic home in the new Space Show Dark Universe.

A time-lapse of type 1a supernovae in the Milky Way galaxy

via amnhnyc

February272013
Making a Black Hole
This illustration depicts the creation and almost instant evaporation of a tiny black hole in one of the instruments of the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. Some theories say the collider should be able to produce such tiny black holes, which would have been created en masse in the Big Bang. But such black holes would last only a tiny fraction of a second, leaving Earth unscathed. [Joao Pequenao/ATLAS/CERN]

Making a Black Hole

This illustration depicts the creation and almost instant evaporation of a tiny black hole in one of the instruments of the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. Some theories say the collider should be able to produce such tiny black holes, which would have been created en masse in the Big Bang. But such black holes would last only a tiny fraction of a second, leaving Earth unscathed. [Joao Pequenao/ATLAS/CERN]

(Source: stardate.org)

February172013
What’s up with all the weird meteors lately?
The meteors this month have been acting a little strange — they’re particularly fiery, and they take a very long time to burn out. It turns out this is not an isolated incident; speculation over the strangeness of February meteors goes back at least half a century.
Now that we have the technology to keep close tabs on their activity, the data actually suggests there may be some truth to the rumors: February’s fireballs are a bit different from those of other months, and that, say scientists, is very puzzling.
Back in the sixties and seventies, a group of amateur astronomers came up with something called the “Fireballs of February.” The phrase was used to describe what they claimed was higher-than-average fireball activity during the shortest month of the year.

What’s up with all the weird meteors lately?

The meteors this month have been acting a little strange — they’re particularly fiery, and they take a very long time to burn out. It turns out this is not an isolated incident; speculation over the strangeness of February meteors goes back at least half a century.

Now that we have the technology to keep close tabs on their activity, the data actually suggests there may be some truth to the rumors: February’s fireballs are a bit different from those of other months, and that, say scientists, is very puzzling.

Back in the sixties and seventies, a group of amateur astronomers came up with something called the “Fireballs of February.” The phrase was used to describe what they claimed was higher-than-average fireball activity during the shortest month of the year.

(Source: io9.com)

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